Subiesmith https://subiesmith.com/ YOUR TRUSTED, ASE CERTIFIED SUBARU MECHANICS Mon, 21 Nov 2022 22:38:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://subiesmith.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/cropped-favicon-32x32.png Subiesmith https://subiesmith.com/ 32 32 COVID-19 INFORMATION FOR OUR DRIVERS https://subiesmith.com/covid-19-information-for-our-drivers/ Tue, 17 Mar 2020 21:50:17 +0000 https://subiesmith.com/?p=1849 We Are Open And Going StroNg! Hello to all our Subaru drivers. I hope everyone is staying safe and healthy out there. The good news is that the countries that were hit early by the virus are already recovering. We are optimistic that this outbreak will be temporary, and we plan to continue to provide […]

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We Are Open And Going StroNg!

Hello to all our Subaru drivers. I hope everyone is staying safe and healthy out there. The good news is that the countries that were hit early by the virus are already recovering. We are optimistic that this outbreak will be temporary, and we plan to continue to provide Subaru repair services throughout the ordeal.

Please visit and like our Facebook page. We haven’t used that much in the past, but it will be our primary way of communicating with our customers as a whole during the ever changing outbreak situation.

We are open and taking appointments. However, beginning on Wednesday, March 18 we will be going to no-human-contact processes here at the shop.

What that means is that we will be open Monday through Friday at our regular hours, but the building will only be accessible to our staff members. Dropping Off Your Car – Please drop off your car using our after-hours drop box system. The envelopes and drop box are mounted to the outside of the building, just to the left of the front door. Please fill out the envelope, put your keys inside, and place the envelope in the drop box. We will check that box first thing in the morning. Interactions – If you come by during business hours, please knock on the front door and we will come out and have a short conversation to verify contact details. Then get you home where it’s safe. Most of our customer interactions will be over the phone. Picking Up Your Car – We will be getting your keys back to you using our Key Lock Box system, or with a quick meeting in front of the shop. We will be using our online payment system whenever possible.We will continue to disinfect all keys and surfaces on the car that we regularly come in contact with, both before and after service.

We are working on a system to offer vehicle pick up and drop off at your home. If that is something you are interested in, please let us know. There will be minimum purchase amounts and maximum distance restriction on that system.

If you find yourself working from home, and not needing your vehicle, this could be a good opportunity to catch up on some of those repairs that have been waiting on your to-do list. This will help keep our valuable team members in place both now and in the future to service your Subaru for years to come.

Pro Tip: If you order on Amazon for grocery delivery, your odds of getting a delivery spot are much better if you place your order around midnight.

Thank you all for your business and we look forward to this outbreak being a thing of the past.

-Aaron

Subiesmith
720.295.0007

The post COVID-19 INFORMATION FOR OUR DRIVERS appeared first on Subiesmith.

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Camshaft Carrier Reseal Complications https://subiesmith.com/camshaft-carrier-reseal-complications/ Thu, 05 Mar 2020 16:32:03 +0000 https://subiesmith.com/?p=1829 The post Camshaft Carrier Reseal Complications appeared first on Subiesmith.

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Camshaft Carrier Reseal Complication

Hello Subaru Driver

Thank you for choosing Subiesmith to reseal your camshaft carrier.

Before we begin, we want to go over some information you should be aware of. 

We are about to perform a very involved procedure on your vehicle. As with any complex procedure, there is always a possibility that complications may arise during or after service. We want to prepare you for the more common of these possibilities.

Please read below and acknowledge that you have completely read and fully understand the risks by signing the form at the bottom of the page.

Rod Knock

What is it?

A rod knock is a sound that results when the bearing at the connecting rod attaches and the crankshaft comes loose. When the bearing comes loose, the connecting rod and crankshaft can rattle against one another. This will result in a repetitive “knocking” sound that becomes more rapid as engine rpm increases. Although, the failure can manifest in other ways as well.

What causes it?

The primary cause of rod knock is running the engine low on oil. High engine RPMs and normal wear and tear can contribute as well. If the engine ran low on oil before the leak was fixed, there is a chance that the damage that leads to a rod knock may have already started developing. When we take the engine out to reseal the camshaft carriers, we drain all of the oil out of it. This necessary process can accelerate the connecting rod bearings failing if the process was already started. No part of the standard camshaft carrier reseal will cause this failure.

Unfortunately, there is no way to tell if the engine has the beginning of a rod knock failure before the sound presents. The only way to visually inspect for this would be to completely disassemble the short block, which would add several thousand dollars to the repair. Without symptoms present, there is no justification to perform that procedure, with its high cost, as preventative.

If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How common is it?

We see about one out of fifty engines develop a rod knock within 10,000 miles of a camshaft carrier reseal. Sometimes it can happen right after service, sometimes it can take several thousand miles. If the engine has run low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How do we fix it?

The fix for this failure is to replace or rebuild the short block. The short block is the portion of the engine that houses the crankshaft and pistons. This can be very expensive, as well as very time-consuming to access. The exact price and timeframe will vary by engine and replacement part availability.

If the short block does fail within the warranty period on the camshaft carriers, we will help with the cost. There are two elements to the short block replacement; the short block itself and the labor and parts kit to replace it. You will be responsible for the full cost of the replacement short block, but the parts kit and labor needed to install the short block will be covered on a prorated scale based on mileage since the original camshaft carrier reseal. If your short block fails within the first 1,000 miles of the warranty, we will cover 100% of the parts kit and labor. After the first 1,000 miles, the amount we discount will be equal to the percentage of the 12,000-mile warranty that remains. Once the warranty has expired, by mileage or time, there will be no discount toward a short block replacement.

Oil Consumption

What is it?

There are two ways that oil can leave an engine; it can leak out externally or it can burn with the air/fuel mixture internally. This is specifically referring to internal oil loss. We know you have oil consumption if the engine oil level declines, but none of the missing oil is leaking out of the engine. According to Subaru, up to one quart of oil consumption every 1,000 miles is normal.

What causes it?

The most common cause of oil consumption is having run an engine with a low oil level. The lack of lubrication will cause scoring on the cylinder walls, which will result in some of the oil sneaking past the piston rings. But even if the engine never ran low on oil, normal wear and tear can cause this. Sometimes, major engine repairs can accelerate the rate of consumption.

How common is it?

Most Subarus with more than 100k miles will experience some form of oil consumption. Severe oil consumption, or more than a quart every 1,000 miles, is rare. We see about one out of fifty engines with severe oil consumption. If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How do we fix it?

The easiest and most economical way to address this issue is to check and top off the engine oil on a regular basis. We understand that this is not always convenient. There are also oil additives that can help slow the process.

The full solution to this issue is to rebuild the short block. This option will cost thousands of dollars. Drivers very rarely choose to go this route due to the high cost.

Spun Camshaft Bearings

What is it?

A spun camshaft bearing is damage to the precision machined surfaces that the camshaft rotates on. These smooth surfaces become rough and scored.

What causes it?

The rotating camshaft is held away from the housing it sits in by a very thin layer of pressurized oil. If there is debris in the oil, or if the oil pressure drops from a lack of oil in the engine, these smooth, precision-machined surfaces will start to rub on each other. This will make them rough and they will start to bind up to each other.  They will eventually seize up, causing catastrophic engine failure.

How common is it?

This is not a very common failure. We see this happen on about one out of seventy-five engines. If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How do we fix it?

If the damage is minor, we may be able to polish the bearing surfaces smoothly again. If the damage is severe, we will need to replace the damaged cylinder head. The cost for that will vary depending on part availability.

Parts Unsafe to Reinstall

What is it?

We may get your engine apart and find that parts we did not plan on replacing will need to be replaced. If reinstalling the faulty parts will create a dangerous situation, we may be required to replace these so we can continue with reinstalling your engine.

What causes it?

There are a variety of things that can fall under this type of failure. One of the best examples is a timing belt tensioner that won’t hold tension. If we were to reinstall a failing tensioner, the resulting repairs could cost thousands of dollars. These failures are rarely the fault of the driver. Typically, these things are parts that are well past their useful life.

How common is it?

We see crucially failing parts on about one out of twenty-five engines.

How do we fix it?

The exact fix will depend on what is failing. We will always do our best to get your permission before proceeding with repairs that exceed what you have already authorized. However, if it is not possible for us to continue without a certain repair, and we have been unable to reach you by phone, text, and email for more than 3 hours, we may authorize up to $300 in additional repairs on your behalf.

Catalytic Converter Failure

What is it?

The catalytic converter, or “cat,” is an active filter that sits in the exhaust piping. It converts unburned fuel and other harmful pollutants into less harmful pollutants. It is monitored by the engine computer using a dedicated sensor located just downstream of the cat. If the cat isn’t doing a good enough job of cleaning up the exhaust gasses, the sensor will see this, and the check engine light will come on.

An underperforming cat may cause your car to fail an emission test. This failure will rarely cause your vehicle to underperform, but in extreme cases can cause a lack of power under acceleration.

What Causes it?

Catalytic converters wear out over time. The high-temperature chemical reactions that take place in the cat will slowly become less efficient. Driving your car with an active misfire, out-of-specification fuel trims, or while internally burning oil may accelerate the failure. A faulty cat test sensor may cause the test to fail.

When we remove the engine from the car to perform the camshaft carrier reseal, we disconnect the battery. This resets the engine computer. When the computer is powered back up, it has to rerun all of its tests on the cat. If a cat was close to failure before, it may fail this retest. It may take a few days to a few weeks of regular driving for the vehicle to retest the cat.

How common is it?

Catalytic converter failure is pretty common on Subaru’s over 100k miles. The vehicles made from 2000 through 2015 seem to be more susceptible. About one in fifteen will see a cat test failure after resealing the camshaft carriers. Most will see this failure before 200k miles.

How do we fix it?

If the cat fails, the correct fix is to replace the cat. If the sensor fails, then replace the sensor. There are fuel system additives that claim to clean up the cat, but we haven’t seen any convincing evidence that these additives work well. Cats can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to two thousand, as they contain rare metals. The sensor costs a few hundred dollars to replace.

Parts Unsafe to Reinstall

What is it?

We may get your engine apart and find that parts we did not plan on replacing will need to be replaced. If reinstalling the faulty parts will create a dangerous situation, we may be required to replace these so we can continue with reinstalling your engine.

What causes it?

There are a variety of things that can fall under this type of failure. One of the best examples is a timing belt tensioner that won’t hold tension. If we were to reinstall a failing tensioner, the resulting repairs could cost thousands of dollars. These failures are rarely the fault of the driver. Typically, these things are parts that are well past their useful life.

How common is it?

We see crucially failing parts on about one out of twenty-five engines.

How do we fix it?

The exact fix will depend on what is failing. We will always do our best to get your permission before proceeding with repairs that exceed what you have already authorized. However, if it is not possible for us to continue without a certain repair, and we have been unable to reach you by phone, text, and email for more than 3 hours, we may authorize up to $300 in additional repairs on your behalf.

Acknowledgment of Receipt and Understanding

Once you have read and understood the above information, please enter your name and vehicle info in the spaces below. This will notify our team that you have received the above information. If you have any questions, please contact us.

  • I acknowledge that I have received the Subiesmith CAMSHAFT CARRIER RESEAL Complication Notice and that I have read and understand the policies.

  • Should be Empty:

SubieSmith would be happy to service your Subaru.

By choosing us, you get:

 

Schedule an appointment today and get routine maintenance for your Subaru.

subaur

Frequently Asked Questions

Early Drop-off & Late Pickup

How Long Does it Take?

ASE Certified

Safety First

SUBIESMITH

MISSION

Subiesmith is completely transparent in walking customers through the necessary repairs and guarantees their work, unlike other mechanic shops that just hand you a bill when they’re finished.

lakewood

7999 W 16th Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80214
(720) 295-0007
repair@lakewood.subiesmith.com

The post Camshaft Carrier Reseal Complications appeared first on Subiesmith.

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Head Gasket Complications https://subiesmith.com/head-gasket-complications/ Thu, 05 Mar 2020 16:31:47 +0000 https://subiesmith.com/?p=1832 The post Head Gasket Complications appeared first on Subiesmith.

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Head Gasket Complication

Hello Subaru Driver

Thank you for choosing Subiesmith to replace your head gaskets.

Before we begin, we want to go over some information you should be aware of. 

We are about to perform a very involved procedure on your vehicle. As with any complex procedure, there is always a possibility that complications may arise during or after service. We want to prepare you for the more common of these possibilities.

Please read below and acknowledge that you have completely read and fully understand the risks by signing the form at the bottom of the page.

Rod Knock

What is it?

A rod knock is a sound that results when the bearing at the connecting rod attaches and the crankshaft comes loose.  When the bearing comes loose, the connecting rod and crankshaft can rattle against one another. This will result in a repetitive “knocking” sound that becomes more rapid as engine rpm increases. Although, the sound can manifest in other ways as well.

What causes it?

The primary cause of rod knock is running the engine low on oil. High engine RPMs and normal wear and tear can contribute as well. If the engine ran low on oil before the leak was fixed, there is a chance that the damage that leads to a rod knock may have already started developing. When we take the engine out to replace the head gaskets, we drain all of the oil out of it. This necessary process can accelerate the connecting rod bearings failing if the process was already started. No part of the standard head gasket service will cause this failure.

Unfortunately, there is no way to tell if the engine has the beginning of a rod knock failure before the sound presents itself. The only way to visually inspect for this would be to completely disassemble the short block, which would add several thousand dollars to the repair. Without symptoms present, there is no justification to perform that procedure, with its high cost, as preventative.

If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How common is it?

We see about one out of twenty-five engines develop a rod knock within 10,000 miles of a head gasket service. Sometimes it can happen right after service, sometimes it can take several thousand miles. If the engine has run low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How do we fix it?

The fix for this failure is to replace or rebuild the short block. The short block is the portion of the engine that houses the crankshaft and pistons. This can be very expensive, as well as very time-consuming to access. The exact price and timeframe will vary by engine and replacement part availability.

If the short block does fail within the warranty period on the head gaskets, we will help with the cost. There are two elements to the short block replacement; the short block itself and the labor and parts kit to replace it. You will be responsible for the full cost of the replacement short block, but the parts kit and labor needed to install the short block will be covered on a prorated scale based on mileage since the original head gasket service. If your short block fails within the first 1,000 miles of the warranty, we will cover 100% of the parts kit and labor. After the first 1,000 miles, the amount we discount will be equal to the percentage of the 12,000-mile warranty that remains. Once the warranty has expired, by mileage or time, there will be no discount toward a short block replacement.

Warped Block Surfaces

What is it? In order for the new head gaskets to seal properly, the machined engine surfaces that mate to the head gaskets must be perfectly flat. We have a specified maximum variation in that surface of .0015” from one corner to the other. There are two surfaces that mate to the head gasket, the cylinder head decks surfaces and the short block deck surfaces. Warpage in the cylinder head decks is very common and an easy fix. That service is already included in the price of the head gaskets. Correcting the warpage of the short block decks is much more complicated. What causes it? The primary cause of warped short block decks is severe engine overheating. We do see this happen from time to time without a severe overheating condition. It is also possible that a previously done head gasket repair where the prior shop did not properly clean these deck surfaces can cause the surface variation to be in the decks. If the engine did not overheat, the odds of this failure are very low. How common is it? We see about one out of fifty engines with short block deck surfaces that are warped beyond specification. If the engine severely overheated, the odds of this failure go up significantly. How do we fix it? We have two options:
  1. Apply a spray-on coating to the head gasket that may assist in sealing the head gasket. This fix doesn’t add any additional cost to the repair. This is only an option if the deck surfaces are out of spec by a small amount. This method will void the warranty on the head gaskets, as this is not considered to be a “proper” repair. We cannot guarantee this will solve the leak.
  2. Disassemble the short block so the short block deck surfaces can be resurfaced by a machine shop. This will add a significant cost to the repair but will maintain the warranty. This is effectively a rebuild or reconditions of the short block.

Oil Consumption

What is it?

There are two ways that oil can leave an engine; it can leak out externally or it can burn with the air/fuel mixture internally. This is specifically referring to internal oil loss. We know you have oil consumption if the engine oil level declines, but none of the missing oil is leaking out of the engine. According to Subaru, up to one quart of oil consumption every 1,000 miles is normal.

What causes it?

The most common cause of oil consumption is having run an engine with a low oil level. The lack of lubrication will cause scoring on the cylinder walls, which will result in some of the oil sneaking past the piston rings. But even if the engine never ran low on oil, normal wear and tear can cause this. Sometimes, major engine repairs can accelerate the rate of consumption.

How common is it?

Most Subarus with more than 100k miles will experience some form of oil consumption. Severe oil consumption, or more than a quart every 1,000 miles, is rare. We see about one out of fifty engines with severe oil consumption. If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly.

How do we fix it?

The easiest and most economical way to address this issue is to check and top off the engine oil on a regular basis. We understand that this is not always convenient. There are also oil additives that can help slow the process.

The full solution to this issue is to rebuild the short block. This option will cost thousands of dollars.  Drivers very rarely choose to go this route due to the high cost.

Spun Camshaft Bearings

What is it?

A spun camshaft bearing is damage to the precision machined surfaces that the camshaft rotates on. These smooth surfaces become rough and scored.

What causes it?

The rotating camshaft is held away from the housing it sits in by a very thin layer of pressurized oil. If there is debris in the oil, or if the oil pressure drops from a lack of oil in the engine, these smooth, precision-machined surfaces will start to rub on each other. This will make them rough and they will start to bind up to each other. They will eventually seize up, causing catastrophic engine failure.

How common is it?

This is not a very common failure. We see this happen on about one out of seventy-five engines. If the engine ran low on oil, the odds of this failure go up significantly. We may not have the opportunity to inspect for this damage unless we receive authorization to remove the camshafts. This is not a default part of the head gasket replacement on some engines.

How do we fix it?

Once you have read and understood the above information, please enter your name and vehicle info in the spaces below. This will notify our team that you have received the above information. If you have any questions, please contact us.

  • I acknowledge that I have received the Subiesmith Head Gasket Complication Notice and that I have read and understand the policies.

  • Should be Empty:

SubieSmith would be happy to service your Subaru.

By choosing us, you get:

 

Schedule an appointment today and get routine maintenance for your Subaru.

subaur

Frequently Asked Questions

Early Drop-off & Late Pickup

How Long Does it Take?

ASE Certified

Safety First

SUBIESMITH

MISSION

Subiesmith is completely transparent in walking customers through the necessary repairs and guarantees their work, unlike other mechanic shops that just hand you a bill when they’re finished.

lakewood

7999 W 16th Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80214
(720) 295-0007
repair@lakewood.subiesmith.com

If the damage is minor, we may be able to polish the bearing surfaces smoothly again. If the damage is severe, we will need to replace the damaged cylinder head. The cost for that will vary depending on part availability.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row]

Parts Unsafe to Reinstall

What is it?

We may get your engine apart and find that parts we did not plan on replacing will need to be replaced. If reinstalling the faulty parts will create a dangerous situation, we may be required to replace these so we can continue with reinstalling your engine.

What causes it?

There are a variety of things that can fall under this type of failure. One of the best examples is a timing belt tensioner that won’t hold tension. If we were to reinstall a failing tensioner, the resulting repairs could cost thousands of dollars. These failures are rarely the fault of the driver. Typically, these things are parts that are well past their useful life.

How common is it?

We see crucially failing parts on about one out of twenty-five engines.

How do we fix it?

The exact fix will depend on what is failing. We will always do our best to get your permission before proceeding with repairs that exceed what you have already authorized. However, if it is not possible for us to continue without a certain repair, and we have been unable to reach you by phone, text, and email for more than 3 hours, we may authorize up to $300 in additional repairs on your behalf.

Catalytic Converter Failure

What is it?

The catalytic converter, or “cat,” is an active filter that sits in the exhaust piping. It converts unburned fuel and other harmful pollutants into less harmful pollutants. It is monitored by the engine computer using a dedicated sensor located just downstream of the cat. If the cat isn’t doing a good enough job of cleaning up the exhaust gasses, the sensor will see this, and the check engine light will come on.

An underperforming cat may cause your car to fail an emission test. This failure will rarely cause your vehicle to underperform, but in extreme cases can cause a lack of power under acceleration.

What Causes it?

Catalytic converters wear out over time. The high-temperature chemical reactions that take place in the cat will slowly become less efficient. Driving your car with an active misfire, out-of-specification fuel trims, or while internally burning oil may accelerate the failure. A faulty cat test sensor may cause the test to fail.

When we remove the engine from the car to perform the head gasket repair, we disconnect the battery. This resets the engine computer. When the computer is powered back up, it has to rerun all of its tests on the cat. If a cat was close to failure before, it may fail this retest. It may take a few days to a few weeks of regular driving for the vehicle to retest the cat.

How common is it?

Catalytic converter failure is pretty common on Subaru’s over 100k miles. The vehicles made from 2000 through 2015 seem to be more susceptible. About one in fifteen will see a cat test failure after head gaskets. Most will see this failure before 200k miles.

How do we fix it?

If the cat fails, the correct fix is to replace the cat. If the sensor fails, then replace the sensor. There are fuel system additives that claim to clean up the cat, but we haven’t seen any convincing evidence that these additives work well. Cats can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to two thousand, as they contain rare metals. The sensor costs a few hundred dollars to replace.

Acknowledgment of Receipt and Understanding

Once you have read and understood the above information, please enter your name and vehicle info in the spaces below. This will notify our team that you have received the above information. If you have any questions, please contact us.

  • I acknowledge that I have received the Subiesmith Head Gasket Complication Notice and that I have read and understand the policies.

  • Should be Empty:
[/et_pb_section]

SubieSmith would be happy to service your Subaru.

By choosing us, you get:

 

Schedule an appointment today and get routine maintenance for your Subaru.

subaur

Frequently Asked Questions

Early Drop-off & Late Pickup

How Long Does it Take?

ASE Certified

Safety First

SUBIESMITH

MISSION

Subiesmith is completely transparent in walking customers through the necessary repairs and guarantees their work, unlike other mechanic shops that just hand you a bill when they’re finished.

lakewood

7999 W 16th Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80214
(720) 295-0007
repair@lakewood.subiesmith.com

If the damage is minor, we may be able to polish the bearing surfaces smoothly again. If the damage is severe, we will need to replace the damaged cylinder head. The cost for that will vary depending on part availability.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row]

Parts Unsafe to Reinstall

What is it?

We may get your engine apart and find that parts we did not plan on replacing will need to be replaced. If reinstalling the faulty parts will create a dangerous situation, we may be required to replace these so we can continue with reinstalling your engine.

What causes it?

There are a variety of things that can fall under this type of failure. One of the best examples is a timing belt tensioner that won’t hold tension. If we were to reinstall a failing tensioner, the resulting repairs could cost thousands of dollars. These failures are rarely the fault of the driver. Typically, these things are parts that are well past their useful life.

How common is it?

We see crucially failing parts on about one out of twenty-five engines.

How do we fix it?

The exact fix will depend on what is failing. We will always do our best to get your permission before proceeding with repairs that exceed what you have already authorized. However, if it is not possible for us to continue without a certain repair, and we have been unable to reach you by phone, text, and email for more than 3 hours, we may authorize up to $300 in additional repairs on your behalf.

Catalytic Converter Failure

What is it?

The catalytic converter, or “cat,” is an active filter that sits in the exhaust piping. It converts unburned fuel and other harmful pollutants into less harmful pollutants. It is monitored by the engine computer using a dedicated sensor located just downstream of the cat. If the cat isn’t doing a good enough job of cleaning up the exhaust gasses, the sensor will see this, and the check engine light will come on.

An underperforming cat may cause your car to fail an emission test. This failure will rarely cause your vehicle to underperform, but in extreme cases can cause a lack of power under acceleration.

What Causes it?

Catalytic converters wear out over time. The high-temperature chemical reactions that take place in the cat will slowly become less efficient. Driving your car with an active misfire, out-of-specification fuel trims, or while internally burning oil may accelerate the failure. A faulty cat test sensor may cause the test to fail.

When we remove the engine from the car to perform the head gasket repair, we disconnect the battery. This resets the engine computer. When the computer is powered back up, it has to rerun all of its tests on the cat. If a cat was close to failure before, it may fail this retest. It may take a few days to a few weeks of regular driving for the vehicle to retest the cat.

How common is it?

Catalytic converter failure is pretty common on Subaru’s over 100k miles. The vehicles made from 2000 through 2015 seem to be more susceptible. About one in fifteen will see a cat test failure after head gaskets. Most will see this failure before 200k miles.

How do we fix it?

If the cat fails, the correct fix is to replace the cat. If the sensor fails, then replace the sensor. There are fuel system additives that claim to clean up the cat, but we haven’t seen any convincing evidence that these additives work well. Cats can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to two thousand, as they contain rare metals. The sensor costs a few hundred dollars to replace.

Acknowledgment of Receipt and Understanding

Once you have read and understood the above information, please enter your name and vehicle info in the spaces below. This will notify our team that you have received the above information. If you have any questions, please contact us.

  • I acknowledge that I have received the Subiesmith Head Gasket Complication Notice and that I have read and understand the policies.

  • Should be Empty:
[/et_pb_section]

SubieSmith would be happy to service your Subaru.

By choosing us, you get:

 

Schedule an appointment today and get routine maintenance for your Subaru.

subaur

Frequently Asked Questions

Early Drop-off & Late Pickup

How Long Does it Take?

ASE Certified

Safety First

SUBIESMITH

MISSION

Subiesmith is completely transparent in walking customers through the necessary repairs and guarantees their work, unlike other mechanic shops that just hand you a bill when they’re finished.

lakewood

7999 W 16th Ave.
Lakewood, CO 80214
(720) 295-0007
repair@lakewood.subiesmith.com

The post Head Gasket Complications appeared first on Subiesmith.

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